Tag Archives: GRT

Garden room extension

 This single storey rear extension improves the visual and physical connection between the house and the garden whilst providing additional living space to compensate for the loss of space that was taken up by the provision of a comfortable office space for our client who works from home on a regular basis. Previously the property had no doors on the rear elevation, only windows. Also the floor level of the property was set approximately 1 meter higher than that of the garden. The extension, which has a floor level lower than that of the house, bridges the level difference with external steps allowing access from the extension to the garden. Within the extension the consistent ceiling height spanning between old and new gives the internal space a light and airy feel whilst the tall openings serve to maintain views of the garden from the kitchen and dining room. The splayed wall of the extension was implemented to allow greater privacy for both our client and the adjoining neighbour. The original brick outbuilding was adapted and incorporated into the design to form a practical utility area whilst enabling access from front-to-back without the need to pass through the living spaces.

Arts and Crafts addition

Our clients had recently purchased a large detached property with an annexe building at the rear of their garden. They wanted to make this little building work for them and help fund extensions and improvements to their new home. The annexe was formerly a golf house ancillary to a golf course which had long since been developed as a housing estate. The main house itself is a well-proportioned arts and crafts home with original features of the period, but lacking in modern facilities to service large reception spaces. Our design for both buildings seeks to reference the materiality of the principle house, with its red clay-tile roofing, but eschewing vertical mullioned glazing and instead utilizing large-format modern versions.

Hillside extension

Our clients had recently purchased this mid-century gem with jaw dropping views overlooking the Derwent valley to the rear. The existing house is upside down, with bedroom on the lower level and clings to a steep slope with the rear garden a further level down. Space to the side of the house presented the most obvious location for an extension, replacing a dilapidated patio area. We designed a two-storey extension to tone in with the modern architecture, with large-format glazing to the south overlooking the valley and access out at lower-ground level from the master suite to a new terrace area.

Extension over garage

 Our client wished to increase the living area and to take advantage of the views on offer over the Ecclesbourne valley and we proposed to build over the existing double garage with a lightweight timber frame. The styling of the extension provides a timely 'facelift' to the existing bungalow. Almost complete, these latest photographs show promising signs of what will be a fantastic space.

Extension to Smithy cottage

 This project required a phased response. Initially the existing cottage was to undergo a scheme of wholesale refurbishment and modernisation in order for the clients to move in from their temporary rented home. Some of the rooms needed to be easily changed over once an extension was designed, approved and built; for instance the temporary kitchen is now the utility room.

Our brief was to create a large extension which would accommodate the main living spaces, master bedroom and a guest suite. The principle behind the concept was to orientate the structure to maximise the views over the adjacent Ogston Reservoir and surrounding woodland. This resulted in a modern, juxtaposed form, which contrasts with the original traditional stone cottage.

Our clients had been inspired by several elements of design from travelling and were keen to incorporate many such as ‘hit & miss’ timber cladding. To date, the house hasn’t generated a single energy bill after being fitted with Air Source Heat Pumps and Solar PV arrays on the roof. When the sun is shining, they are often in credit and receiving a return from the National Grid.